NMSU WS Prof

Blog connected to Women's, Gender,and Sexuality Studies. Posts do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the WSP or faculty. They are presented here to circulate discussion and share information.

twitter.com/NMSUWSProf:

    "I hear that and I think, really? People hate Betty Draper more than they hate Rapist Greg? He’s a straight-up legit rapist and you’re gonna hate Betty more because she’s a a mean pretty lady?"

    Lane Moore talking about how Betty Draper is the most hated character in Mad Men

    (via LadyTV podcast)

    i did this podcast and talked about Mad Men, Buffy, gender, queerness, feminism, sexism, and women in comedy and you should listen to it because we left no stone unturned and i explore a theory that Betty Draper is gayyyy.

    (via areyouwritingthisalldown)

    (via elizabitchtaylor)

    — 13 hours ago with 68 notes
    http://the-uncensored-she.tumblr.com/post/83305755214/radical-bias-if-men-were-tragically-unaware-of →

    radical-bias:

    if men were tragically unaware of their oppressor status they would be much less specific than “feminists are all fat ugly and lesbians”

    men know exactly what they are doing as evidenced by their claims that feminists are exactly that which does not service them correctly

    And this system can be used against other men as well.

    — 13 hours ago with 524 notes
    fuckyeahasiandykes:

Stand up. Stand in solidarity. Stand for what you live for.  This is not only a racist issue, but also a sexist issue. Please stand in solidarity with the many identities this society consists of.  On Wednesday, February 5, 2014, students were alerted of an anonymous document sent to the UCLA Asian American Studies Center containing what can only be described as a collage of sexist slurs and racial epithets. Referencing language and imagery from an incident during Fall Quarter 2012, where a sign stating “asian women R Honkie white-boy worshipping Whores” was posted outside the UCLA Vietnamese Student Union Office, the document makes a deliberate effort to induce hurt and to provoke a response. It would be foolish to assume otherwise. OFFICIAL PRESS RELEASE: http://apcla.org/wordpress/2014/02/06/official-response-to-the-flyer-mailed-to-the-asian-american-studies-center/

    fuckyeahasiandykes:

    Stand up. Stand in solidarity. Stand for what you live for.

    This is not only a racist issue, but also a sexist issue. Please stand in solidarity with the many identities this society consists of.

    On Wednesday, February 5, 2014, students were alerted of an anonymous document sent to the UCLA Asian American Studies Center containing what can only be described as a collage of sexist slurs and racial epithets. Referencing language and imagery from an incident during Fall Quarter 2012, where a sign stating “asian women R Honkie white-boy worshipping Whores” was posted outside the UCLA Vietnamese Student Union Office, the document makes a deliberate effort to induce hurt and to provoke a response. It would be foolish to assume otherwise.

    OFFICIAL PRESS RELEASE: http://apcla.org/
    wordpress/2014/02/06/official-response-to-the-flyer-mailed-to-the-asian-american-studies-center/

    (via angrywocunited)

    — 13 hours ago with 242 notes
    policymic:

Monica was arrested for “walking while trans” — and now her supporters are fighting back

In the Grand Canyon state, “walking while trans” may very well be a criminal act.
That was the message sent last Friday by the Phoenix judge who convicted transwoman Monica Jones of “manifesting prostitution” following her arrest by undercover police officers in May of 2013.
Read more | Follow policymic

    policymic:

    Monica was arrested for “walking while trans” — and now her supporters are fighting back

    In the Grand Canyon state, “walking while trans” may very well be a criminal act.

    That was the message sent last Friday by the Phoenix judge who convicted transwoman Monica Jones of “manifesting prostitution” following her arrest by undercover police officers in May of 2013.

    Read moreFollow policymic

    (via fascinasians)

    — 14 hours ago with 1522 notes
    "

    I’ve never been female. But I have been black my whole life. I can perhaps offer some insight from that perspective. There are many similar social issues related to access to equal opportunity that we find in the black community, as well as the community of women in a white male dominate society…

    When I look at — throughout my life — I’ve known that I wanted to do astrophysics since I was 9 years old…I got to see how the world around me reacted to my expressions of these ambitions. All I can say is, the fact that I wanted to be a scientist, an astrophysicist was hands down the path of most resistance through the forces of society.

    Anytime I expressed this interest, teachers would say, ‘Oh, don’t you wanna be an athlete?’ I want to become someone that was outside of the paradigm of expectations of the people in power. Fortunately, my depth of interest of the universe was so deep and so fuel enriched that everyone of these curve balls that I was thrown, and fences built in front of me, and hills that I had to climb, I just reach for more fuel, and I just kept going.

    Now, here I am, one of the most visible scientists in the land, and I wanna look behind me and say, ‘Where are the others who might have been this,’ and they’re not there! …I happened to survive and others did not simply because of forces of society that prevented it at every turn. At every turn.

    …My life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks, when you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today.

    So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity, then we can have that conversation.

    "

    Neil DeGrasse Tyson in response to a question posed by Lawrence Summers, former Treasury Security and Harvard University President

    "What’s up with chicks and science?"

    Are there genetic differences between men and women, explain why more men are in science.

    (via magnius159)

    (via moviemeatloaf)

    — 22 hours ago with 9109 notes

    wheatthins245:

    cosplay-in-the-usa:

    Please take a moment and watch this video.

    Holy shit

    (Source: missrep, via kittiesbigandsmall)

    — 22 hours ago with 149354 notes
    lalondes:


Humbert Culture and the Case of James Franco

In Humbert culture, little girls are like Nabokov’s narrator described them in Lolita: “little deadly demons” among “wholesome” children, unconscious of their fantastic power and their capacity to ensnare men. Why else would the New York Times, reporting upon the rape of an eleven-year-old by eighteen men, remark upon how the girl “dressed older than her age” and hung out with “teenage boys” on the playground? Why else would the theory that Dolores Haze seduced Humbert Humbert have any salience in popular culture? Why else would James Franco insist that he was deceived by a conniving seventeen-year-old hell-bent on ruining his career? In Humbert culture, girls are wolves, and men are lambs.

    lalondes:

    Humbert Culture and the Case of James Franco

    In Humbert culture, little girls are like Nabokov’s narrator described them in Lolita: “little deadly demons” among “wholesome” children, unconscious of their fantastic power and their capacity to ensnare men. Why else would the New York Times, reporting upon the rape of an eleven-year-old by eighteen men, remark upon how the girl “dressed older than her age” and hung out with “teenage boys” on the playground? Why else would the theory that Dolores Haze seduced Humbert Humbert have any salience in popular culture? Why else would James Franco insist that he was deceived by a conniving seventeen-year-old hell-bent on ruining his career? In Humbert culture, girls are wolves, and men are lambs.

    (via lizziesamuels)

    — 23 hours ago with 1010 notes

    whatsortofamandoesntcarryatrowel:

    Dad: Why do you think they do that?
    Girl: Because the companies who make these try to trick the girls into buying the pink stuff instead of stuff boys want to buy.
    [x]

    that awkward moment when a child understands the harm of forcing gender roles better than most grown male politicians.

    (Source: this-isakindness, via beethovenwasdeaf)

    — 1 day ago with 921088 notes
    "Stonewall was colored folks, poor folks, transsexuals, femmes, butches… a little bit of everybody. But the narrative that gets sold to people is that it was all these ‘A-Gay’ white normative people. That’s not who riots. Sorry."

    Juba Kalamka in this interview (via soldadera-del-amor)

    "that’s not who riots".

    (via genderqueerkid)

    THANK YOU.  

    (via voguingfemme)

    THATS NOT WHO RIOTS!! so perfect

    (via doorhingeteeth)

    (Source: niaking, via decolonizeyourmind)

    — 2 days ago with 13763 notes
    5 Things That Pissed Us Off This Week: Criminally Gay, Trans, and Silent →

    (Source: projectqueer)

    — 3 days ago with 14 notes
    Namibia will seek to deny Ugandan gay refugees sanctuary →

    (Source: projectqueer)

    — 3 days ago with 18 notes

    theatlantic:

    Saving Central: One High School’s Struggle After Resegregation

    Meet the students and staff at Tuscaloosa’s all-black Central High School in a short documentary film by Maisie Crow. 
    — 3 days ago with 88 notes

    pulitzercenter:

    On April 8, the Philippine Supreme Court upheld a controversial new law that, among other things, would provide free contraceptives to poor women. The ruling is seen as a significant blow to the Catholic Church, which fought hard against the legislation for 15 years. Officially known as the Responsible Parenthood and Reproductive Health Act, this legislation guarantees universal access to modern contraception methods, sex education, and maternal care.

    President Benigno Aquino III defied the powerful Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines and ignored threats of excommunication when he signed the law in December 2012. But before it could take effect, church-backed opponents filed a legal challenge, arguing that most forms of contraception other than church-approved “natural” methods or abstinence are tantamount to abortion, which is forbidden by the Constitution in this overwhelmingly Catholic country.

    This week, after deliberating for more than a year, the judges ruled unanimously that the RH Law, as it is called in the Philippines, is “not unconstitutional.”

    The unanimous verdict was a surprise. All indications were of a closely and bitterly divided court. But recognizing the profound importance of the case in the Philippines, the 15 justices, it appears, may have reached their own compromise by agreeing to a unanimous decision, but rejecting some parts of the law that most offended the church. (The court tossed out several provisions imposing criminal sanctions against individuals and groups that refused to provide family planning services on religious grounds as well as nullified a provision that would have given minors access to contraceptives without parental consent.)

    The Bishops’ Conference, which is accustomed to wielding great influence in most spheres of public life, made the best of what was clearly a disappointment, saying the court had “watered down" the RH Law. But people on the frontlines of the struggle against poverty in the Philippines were elated by the court’s decision.

    "I think it is a total victory for the Filipino people. The elimination of certain provisions, we can live with," said Esperanza Cabral, former secretary of the Department of Health and an advocate of the law.

    Read more from Pulitzer Center Senior Editor Tom Hundley through his project: “Indonesia and the Philippines: Gender, Health and Faith

    — 3 days ago with 221 notes